Oregon Coordinating Council on Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia

 

In 2017, the passage of Oregon Senate Bill 1039 created the Oregon Coordinating Council on Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia (OAH Council) to provide recommendations and guidance for the State of Oregon on how to respond to this issue.

Oregon was one of the first places in the world to observe the direct impacts of ocean acidification - oyster hatchery production collapsed in 2007.  Acidification continues to challenge oyster aquaculture productivity and has caused some producers to move operations elsewhere.  Also of great concern, acidification and hypoxia events are continuing to intensify and there are now clear signs that they are undermining the rich ocean ecosystem food web.  Oregon’s iconic fisheries and the coastal communities that depend on them — both of which quintessentially define the world-renowned Oregon Coast — are at risk.

The sponsors of Senate Bill 1039, Senator Arnie Roblan (D) and Senator Jeff Kruse (R), recognized that Oregonians depend on our healthy coastal environment for fisheries, tourism, and recreation. They created the OAH Council to assemble interests that are currently and potentially impacted by OAH in Oregon. The OAH Council forum is composed of members of State agencies, academic experts, stakeholders, and Tribal interests, who will collaboratively develop recommendations, and advise the State on the implementation of actions to support the sustainability of Oregon’s ocean as OAH intensifies.           

 


OAH Council Members – the list of 13 members and their representation - 2020 OAH Council Member Recruitment! 

Meeting Information– includes dates, agendas, minutes, recordings

Council Resources – learn about the OAH Council and its work

Stay Updated – how to subscribe to email lists that will keep you informed of the OAH Council and other ocean policy issues in Oregon


 

Learn More About OAH

Ocean acidification and hypoxia (OAH) is a change in ocean chemistry that is happening right here, right now. And, it is occurring at a faster rate than originally predicted. This phenomena has the potential to have profound impacts on living marine resources. Unfortunately, Oregon has the dubious honor of being the locale that first documented these impacts. In 2007, the Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery had a massive hatchery failure due to acidic oceanic conditions (see the Case Study below).

Visit the Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centers website for OA related news.

Read more: Learn More About OAH

Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network

GOA-ON is a collaborative international approach to document the status and progress of ocean acidification in open-ocean, coastal, and estuarine environments, to understand the drivers and impacts of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems, and to provide spatially and temporally resolved biogeochemical data necessary to optimize modeling for ocean acidification.

 

Explore the GOA-ON Portal

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Public Resources

Area of the OAH website designated for the organization and dissemination of information for the public related to OAH.